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Essay Tips: 7 Tips on Writing an Effective Essay

Explaining Essays

❶Is your essay to inform or persuade? Begin with an attention grabber.

What Constitutes a Strong Argumentative Essay Topic?

Advice on How to Write an Excellent Argumentative Essay
Choosing Topics
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Draw three to five lines branching off from this topic and write down your main ideas at the ends of these lines. Draw more lines off these main ideas and include any thoughts you may have on these ideas. If you prefer to create an outline, write your topic at the top of the page. From there, begin to list your main ideas, leaving space under each one. In this space, make sure to list other smaller ideas that relate to each main idea.

Doing this will allow you to see connections and will help you to write a more organized essay. Now that you have chosen a topic and sorted your ideas into relevant categories, you must create a thesis statement. Your thesis statement tells the reader the point of your essay. Look at your outline or diagram. What are the main ideas?

Your thesis statement will have two parts. The first part states the topic, and the second part states the point of the essay.

The body of your essay argues, explains or describes your topic. Each main idea that you wrote in your diagram or outline will become a separate section within the body of your essay. Each body paragraph will have the same basic structure. Begin by writing one of your main ideas as the introductory sentence. Next, write each of your supporting ideas in sentence format, but leave three or four lines in between each point to come back and give detailed examples to back up your position.

Fill in these spaces with relative information that will help link smaller ideas together. Now that you have developed your thesis and the overall body of your essay, you must write an introduction. Begin with an attention grabber. You can use shocking information, dialogue, a story, a quote, or a simple summary of your topic. Whichever angle you choose, make sure that it ties in with your thesis statement, which will be included as the last sentence of your introduction.

The conclusion brings closure of the topic and sums up your overall ideas while providing a final perspective on your topic. Try to let the verbs and nouns do most of the heavy lifting before you focus on adjectives. Avoid colloquial informal writing.

Do not use contractions or abbreviations e. Your essay should have a serious tone, even if it's written in a light or lyrical style. Analyze how your essay flows. Does each sentence lead smoothly to the next? Does each paragraph flow logically to the next? Although you can analyze your essay by reading through it, it's helpful to make a reverse outline, working from your essay to outline your thoughts. When events happen in sequence: I first started to realize that I was in the minority when I was in middle school My realization was confirmed when I proceeded to high school.

If sentences elaborate on each other: Plants need water to survive A plant's ability to absorb water depends on the nutrition of the soil. When an idea contrasts with another idea: Vegetarians argue that land is unnecessarily wasted by feeding animals to be eaten as food Opponents argue that land being used for grazing would not be able to be used to create any other kind of food. If you're relaying a cause and effect relationship: I will be the first person in my family to graduate from college I am inspired to continue my family's progress through the generations.

When connecting similar ideas: Organic food is thought to be better for the environment. Cut information that's not specifically related to your topic. You don't want your essay to ramble off-topic. Any information that doesn't directly or indirectly support your thesis should be cut out. Have someone read your paper aloud to you. Your ears are sometimes better than your eyes at picking up mistakes in language. The essay should sound like it has a good flow and understandable words.

As an alternative, you can record yourself reading it aloud and play it back. Rewrite any problematic body passages. If needed, rearrange sentences and paragraphs into a different order.

Make sure that both your conclusion and introduction match the changes that you make to the body. Compose your essay with a clear purpose. A persuasive essay is designed to sway the reader to adopt your point of view about a topic.

This means it's important that your views are expressed in a clear, concise manner, which allows the reader to understand your argument. These are good examples of persuasive essay topics you might write about: Whether governments should or should not fund embryonic stem cell research. Whether love is a virtue or a vice. Why Citizen Kane is the best movie of the 20th century. Why American citizens should be forced to vote. Write your essay as though you are conducting a debate.

When you speak in a debate, you introduce your topic, list your evidence and draw a conclusion for the people who are listening. A persuasive essay has a similar structure. Collect facts from good sources to justify your opinions. Support your argument with reasoned facts. A well-written essay is great, but a well-argued essay is undeniable. In addition to doing research, you can perform empirical experiments including taking surveys, doing interviews or conducting experiments.

Survey results or interviews could be great pieces of information to start your essay with. Tell a story about the facts.

Don't just list the facts; tell a story! How would you like to be one of those wrongfully-convicted inmates? Present the other side of your argument and use logic and facts to show why the other side's opinion is either inaccurate or not up-to-date. You're showing the reader you are unbiased and considered the other arguments, but you concluded that your argument is the best.

Time after time, evidence has disproved this theory. The death penalty, in fact, does not act as a deterrent to crime: Tie all your ideas together in a gripping conclusion. Be sure to stress your thesis, or what you are arguing for or against, one last time. Use some of the information you have discussed, or a story you've saved, to color your conclusion a little bit. Choose a subject for your essay. You'll be investigating a topic and presenting your viewpoint about the topic based on evidence.

Research papers usually fall under this category of writing. For example, you could write an expository essay arguing that embryonic stem cell research can lead to cures for spinal cord injuries and illnesses like Parkinson's or diabetes. Expository essays differ from persuasive essays because you aren't stating an opinion. You're stating facts that you can back up with research.

Select your strategy and structure. Some common strategies and structures for expository writing include: Definition essays explain the meaning of terms or concepts. Classification essays organize a topic into groups starting with the most general group and narrowing down to more specific groups.

In this type of essay, you'll describe either the similarities and differences or both between ideas or concepts. These essays explain how topics affect each other and how they are interdependent. How-to essays explain the steps required for completing a task or a procedure with the goal of instructing the reader.

Keep your views unbiased. Expository essays aren't about opinions. They are about drawing a conclusion based on verifiable evidence. You might even find that, with new information, you'll have to revise your essay. If you started out writing about the scarcity of information regarding global warming, but came across a bunch of scientific evidence supporting global warming, you at least have to consider revising what your essay is about. Use the facts to tell the story. The facts will tell the story itself if you let them.

Think like a journalist when writing an expository essay. If you put down all the facts like a reporter, the story should tell itself. Don't mess with structure in expository essays. In narrative essays, you can twist and turn the structure to make the essay more interesting.

Be sure that your structure in expository essays is very linear, making it easier to connect the dots. Tell your story vividly and accurately. A narrative essay recounts an incident that either you or others have experienced. In a narrative essay, you could describe a personal experience in which embryonic stem cell research could have helped you or someone you love conquer a debilitating condition.

Include all of the elements of good storytelling. You'll need an introduction, setting, plot, characters, climax and conclusion. How are you going to set the story up? Is there something useful or important here that gets mentioned later on? Where the action takes place. What does it look like?

Which words can you use to make the reader feel like they are there when they read it? The meat of the story, the essential action. Why is the story worth telling? Who's in the story. What does the story tell us about the characters? What do the characters tell us about the story?

The suspenseful bit before anything is resolved. Are we left hanging on the edges of our seat? Do we need to know what happens next? What does the story mean in the end? How have things, people, ideas changed now that the end is revealed? Have a clear point of view. Most narrative essays are written from the author's point of view, but you can also consider other perspectives as long as your point of view is consistent.

Utilize the pronoun "I" if you are the narrator. In a narrative essay, you can use first person. However, make sure that you don't overdo it. In all essays, you sound more authoritative if you state facts or opinions in third person. You're telling a story, but the purpose of the story is to make a specific point. Introduce your main idea in your thesis statement, and make sure that all of your story elements tie back to your thesis statement.

What did you learn? How is your essay an exploration of the things that you learned? How have you changed? How is the "you" that started the essay different from the "you" now? Related to, but different from, the "what did you learn?

Choose your language carefully. You will use words to evoke emotions in your reader, so choose your words deliberately. Essay Help Essay Template. Like the How-to essay, the Process essay explains how something occurs in time. However, rather than telling the reader how to do it, the process essay explains how it is observed to happen.

You can use this sort of essay to explain something that happens in nature, science, or society. These sorts of essays are easy to organize because the order of the essay is the way it happens. However, the writer does need to carefully decide how to explain the process clearly and vividly to make it interesting. History or background essays take a look at the progression through time of an idea, movement, political decision, social phenomenon, or event.

This sort of writing can be used to discuss the process of natural events, as well. Often, these papers discuss the facts as they occurred and may suggest causes and effects in the chain of events. Often, the subjects can be big enough for several large books, so in a short piece, you may want to tackle just one part of that event.

For example, a "History of Marriage" could look at the major changes in marriage as people moved from primitive societies to towns and then into the industrial age. Alternatively, a "History of Modern Marriage" could examine just the changes in marriage in the past few generations.

Since Prabandha is a medieval Indian Sanskrit literary genre, you probably need to be a bit more specific about what "meaning" you are talking about.

Which saying or anecdotes from Prabandha have had the most influence in Indian culture? How would one write the introduction to this kind of assignment essay question: This type of explaining essay is technical, and so a straightforward introduction is probably the best. You can start with a clear definition, or possibly, you might want to give one or more examples of probability samples, and then give the definition.

How would one write the body of an explaining essay on the topic "designing a primary school library? An explaining essay is usually divided either into sections or topics, or by space and time.

I think with the topic of designing a school library; you should do it by parts of the library or aspects of the library. For example, you could do body paragraphs on the following topics:. See my article on how to write an Explaining Essay: Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites. This was extremely helpful in helping me find a topic for my process analysis essay, figuring out a topic to write on is always the hardest step for me.

Thank you so much! This's is a very good article I am studying for school and I chose how to take good photos. These are such great tips and seem very useful. I will have to keep this page in mind for future reference.

Hi Virginia great hub. You captured a great deal of information in a very organized manner. Many of the ideas you illustrated can be possible hubs: This is a wonderful article for my students! Thanks for writing it: Thanks for the info and topic ideas as well as links to your super hubs. This post will be a helpful resource to many!

I totally agree, Virginia--when I was reading through the lists, I was thinking--hmm--hubs!! Definitely great information for those folks who need to come up with essay topics. I always think that that is the hardest part of writing anything--just knowing what to call it or title it in the case of hubs--and then the ideas start to kind of flow--once you pin down where you want to go.

Thanks rgmgactually, most of Hubpages is written as "Explaining Essays. Excellent and very useful. This is one of those hubs that a person wants to keep to refer back to. Other product and company names shown may be trademarks of their respective owners. HubPages and Hubbers authors may earn revenue on this page based on affiliate relationships and advertisements with partners including Amazon, Google, and others.

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For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: Explaining Essays Give information clearly. Teach the reader something. Tell what, who, why, or how to do something. Are in newspapers, textbooks and magazines.

Explains what can be observed about the process of something, especially something in nature, or how something works. Explains the changes in something over time. Usually used to discuss human history or artifacts. How to organize your room. How to use Google Maps. How to set up a website. How to win a video game. How to avoid procrastination. How to organize a study group. How to customize your car. How to start a small business.

How to use eBay to sell things. How to avoid gaining weight your first year in college. How to find the best deal on a used car. How to pay for college. How to choose a college major. How to apply for a study abroad program. How to train for a marathon. How to keep in shape during college. How to make new friends in college. How to get along with your roommate. How to keep your clothes looking new. How to plant bulbs in southern climates. How to analyze your dreams. How to prevent insomnia.

How to take care of a wound to prevent infection. How to drive a stick shift. How to find a summer job. How to be a lifeguard. How to make homemade specialty coffee. How to take better photographs. How to learn to draw better. How to teach reading to preschoolers.

How to travel inexpensively overseas. How to learn a foreign language. How to style hair. How to arrange flowers. How to entertain guests inexpensively.

HOW TO SELECT DEBATABLE ARGUMENTATIVE TOPICS TO DISCUSS

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List of Topics for How-To Essays Choosing the right topic is critical to success. Share Flipboard Email Print Westend61 / Getty Images For Students & Parents. How to Write an Essay in 5 Simple Steps. 12 Interesting Ethical Topics for Essay Topics. Topic Suggestions for Writing Essays and Speeches.

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Sep 23,  · The five main types of explaining essays are listed in the table below, along with main features of how to write them. I have listed at least twenty-five topic ideas for each type of essay, which should help you choose an idea that appeals to masalahbuatloe.gas:

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Write an approximate plan of your essay, and if you meet some difficulties, you can make some changes in the topic. It is possible since you have the right to choose or change the subject any time. Your topic must comply with the subject matter and reveal the interesting question, maybe even several questions. An essay is a short composition based on a particular subject or theme. It may be written to: describe, persuade, inform or explain a certain theme.

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According to Kathy Livingston’s Guide to Writing a Basic Essay, there are seven steps to writing a successful essay: 1. Pick a topic. You may have your topic assigned, or you may be given free reign to write on the subject of your choice. Essay Tips: 7 Tips on Writing an Effective Essay; 10 College Scholarships You Can Apply for Today. Aug 02,  · How to Write an Essay. Throughout your academic career, you will often be asked to write essays. Write a topic sentence for your main ideas. Then, underneath, make bullet points and list your supporting evidence. Generally, you want three arguments or pieces of evidence to support each main idea. "Thank You wikiHow for teaching me how 74%().