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Examples of Writing a DBQ Essay

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❶Your AP exam study timeline depends on a few things. This is usually several pages long, but can vary based on the nature of the argument, class the DBQ is for, and how much the individual can write in the time limit.

What is a DBQ Essay?

Outline of a DBQ Essay
The Process for Writing a DBQ Essay
Preparing for the DBQ essay

Dale, the factory owner, set regulations in order to ensure the safety and welfare of his youthful workers. Therefore, an additional document such as a descriptive, first person account of working conditions from a mistreated worker child is needed to further make this conclusion ADOC. Harsh environment faced by workers of the Industrial Revolution d In the Conditions of the Working Class in England Doc 7 , it is obvious that worker settlements of the Industrial Revolution were of poor conditions.

For example, rivers running through Manchester were extremely polluted. This most likely caused working individuals to resent their choice of employment and debate on switching to a cleaner, more stable job i. Engels, the author, most likely abhorred the inhumane treatment of workers since he strived for equality for all men POV. Accessed September 14, We will write a custom essay sample on DBQ Outline specifically for you. Leave your email and we will send you an example after 24 hours If you contact us after hours, we'll get back to you in 24 hours or less.

If you have five body paragraphs, you need to scale things back to three. If you are spending twenty minutes writing two paragraphs of contextual information, you need to trim it down to a few relevant sentences. Be mindful of where you are spending a lot of time, and target those areas. Start with 20 minutes for your outline and 50 for your essay, or longer, if you need. Then when you can do it in 20 and 50, move back to 18 minutes and 45 for writing, then to 15 and You absolutely can learn to manage your time effectively so that you can write a great DBQ in the time allotted.

On to the next skill! In other words, how do you reference the information in the documents in a clear, non-awkward way? When you quote a document directly without otherwise identifying it, you may want to include a parenthetical citation. All of the history exams share a DBQ rubric, so the guidelines are identical. Don't worry, you won't need a magnifying glass to examine the rubric.

One point is for having a thesis that works and is historically defensible. This just means that your thesis can be reasonably supported by the documents and historical fact. Per the College Board, your thesis needs to be located in your introduction or your conclusion. You can receive another point for having a super thesis. How will you know whether the historical evidence agrees or disagrees? A super thesis , however, would take the relationships between the documents and the people behind the documents!

One point for using six or seven of the documents in your essay to support your argument. Any summarizing should be connected a point. You can get an additional point here for doing further analysis on 4 of the documents. This further analysis could be in any of these 4 areas:. What is their position in society and how does this influence what they are saying? What are they trying to convince their audience of? Historical context - What broader historical facts are relevant to this document?

Audience - Who is the intended audience for this document? Who is the author addressing or trying to convince? Be sure to tie any further analysis back to your main argument! Before they write the essay, however, New York students have to answer short answer questions about the documents.

Answering Regents exam DBQ short-answer questions is good practice for basic document analysis. This prompt from the Morningside center also has some good document comprehensions questions about a US-History based prompt. Your AP history textbook may also have documents with questions that you can use to practice. Flip around in there! When you want to do a deeper dive on the documents, you can also pull out those old College Board DBQ prompts.

Read the documents carefully. Write down everything that comes to your attention. Of course, you might not be able to do all kinds of further analysis on things like maps and graphs, which is fine. You might also try thinking about how you would arrange those observations in an argument, or even try writing a practice outline!

This exercise would combine your thesis and document-analysis skills practice. It helpfully has an entire list of analysis points for each document. Do you seem way off-base in your interpretation? If so, how did it happen? One point is just for context - if you can locate the issue within its broader historical situation. If the question is about the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression, for example, be sure to include some of the general information you know about the Great Depression!

Read through the prompt and documents and then write down all of the contextualizing facts and as many specific examples as you can think of. I advise timing yourself—maybe minutes to read the documents and prompt and list your outside knowledge—to imitate the time pressure of the DBQ.

This will help fill in holes in your knowledge. All you need to do for synthesis is relate your argument about this specific time period to a different time period, geographical area, historical movement, etc. It is probably easiest to do this in the conclusion of the essay. If your essay is about the Great Depression, you might relate it to the Great Recession of You do need to do more than just mention your synthesis connection.

You need to make it meaningful. How are the two things you are comparing similar? What does one reveal about the other? Is there a key difference that highlights something important? Don't let the DBQ turn you into a dissolving ghost-person, though. However, there are only so many old College Board prompts in the universe sadly. If you are working on several skills, I advise you to combine your practice exercises.

What do I mean? Set your timer for minutes, pull up a prompt, and:. Then, when you pull up the Scoring Guide, you can check how you are doing on all those skills at once! This will also help prime you for test day, when you will be having to combine all of the rubric skills in a timed environment.

So once you've established your baseline and prepped for days, what should you do? It's time to take another practice DBQ to see how you've improved! So, you established a baseline, identified the skills you need to work on, and practiced writing a thesis statement and analyzing documents for hours. Recruit your same trusted advisor to grade your exam and give feedback. After, work on any skills that still need to be honed.

Repeat this process as necessary, until you are consistently scoring your goal score. Then you just need to make sure you maintain your skills until test day by doing an occasional practice DBQ. I know, I know. This will keep your memory sharp!

Eat a good breakfast and lunch, if the exam is in the afternoon before the exam with protein and whole grains. This will keep your blood sugar from crashing and making you tired during the exam. Instead, do something relaxing. Mark them as you read—circle things that seem important, jot thoughts and notes in the margins. Write down themes and concepts that seem important and create a thesis from those. Remember, your thesis needs to answer the question and make a claim!

Which documents support which ideas? Make sure your outline notes where you are going to include your contextual information often placed in the first body paragraph, but this is up to you , your specific example likely in one of the body paragraphs , and your synthesis the conclusion is a good place for this.

Make sure you use all the documents! Take a quick pass over your outline and the docs and make sure all of the docs appear in your outline. This probably just means you have a really thorough outline!

But be ready to write pretty fast. If you have a good outline, the hard part is out of the way! You just need to make sure you get all of your great ideas down in the test booklet. Spend maybe one or two sentences introducing the issue, then get right to your thesis. For your body paragraphs, make sure your topic sentences clearly state the point of the paragraph.

Then you can get right into your evidence and your document analysis. As you write, make sure to keep an eye on the time. You want to be a little more than halfway through at the minute mark of the writing period, so you have a couple minutes to go back and edit your essay at the end. Sentences that are shorter and to the point are completely fine. If you are short on time, the conclusion is the least important part of your essay. When you are done, make one last past through your essay.

Make sure you included everything that was in your outline and hit all the rubric skills! Then take a deep breath and pat yourself on the back. Remember the drill for prep: Make sure that you know the rubric inside and out so you will remember to hit all the necessary points on test day!

On test day, keep yourself on track time-wise! This may seem like a lot, but you can learn how to ace your DBQ! The more you practice, the more natural it will seem, until every DBQ is a breeze. Haven't registered for the test yet? See our article for help registering for AP exams. Studying for World History? See these AP World History study tips from one of our experts.

We've written a guide for each test about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download it for free now:. Ellen has extensive education mentorship experience and is deeply committed to helping students succeed in all areas of life. You should definitely follow us on social media. You'll get updates on our latest articles right on your feed. Follow us on all 3 of our social networks:. How to Get a Perfect , by a Perfect Scorer. Score on SAT Math. Score on SAT Reading.

Score on SAT Writing. What ACT target score should you be aiming for? Key Strategies and Tips. Posted by Ellen McCammon May 9, 8: He's ready to start studying! Preparing for the DBQ The general preparation process is to diagnose, practice, test, and repeat. Establish a Baseline The first thing you need to do is to establish a baseline— figure out where you are at with respect to your DBQ skills.

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DBQ Essay Outline Guide Use the following outline to plan and write your essays, in response to a Document Based Question (DBQ). The format is.

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Sep 03,  · How to Write a DBQ Essay. In the past, Document Based Questions (DBQ) were rarely found outside of AP history exams. However, they're now used in social studies classes across grade levels, so you're bound to take a DBQ test at some 71%(7).

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Write a great DBQ essay! Check out what a DBQ Essay, Download Free DBQ Essay Outline Guide. Do you know how Should you Start Writing a DBQ Essay? Find the answer here! Besides, look through some simple steps to Writing a Perfect DBQ Essay. You can also learn how to Correctly Structure a DBQ Essay. DBQ is known as document-based-question is an unusual type of a formatted timed essay on most AP History Exams; whatever your major is; AP US History, AP European History, and AP World History.

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DBQ EssayOutline Guide Use the following outline to plan and write your essays, in response to a Document Based Question (DBQ). The format. Outline of a DBQ Essay Once you finish going through the prompt and writing down the essential facts, you need to think about the overview of your topic, be it a French revolution dbq essay or any other.